Are you the boss? It's your fault
Empowering contact center excellence for 30 years!

Are you the boss? It's your fault

A manager is only as good as his or her employees and customer service. Show me a group of uninformed, disinterested employees and bad customer service and I’ll show you a bad manager. I’m in Nashville – my first trip to this city. Music is in my blood and I am over the top excited to be here. In Nashville. Not at this hotel:

  • The TV channel info card is not correct, apparently quite outdated. Call downstairs and get a snarky ‘sorry’ and abrupt answer to what channel is CNN? If the cards aren’t correct, and you know that, throw the cards away. Business travelers travel ALL the time. Something as simple as the correct channel for news without a fact-finding mission is much appreciated.
  • Closet door is not finished. One side of the handle is screwed on; the other side looks to have never been finished. Must have been lunchtime. Hope they finished all the screws on the elevator.
  • Asked bellman (person?) which way to the Country Music Hall of Fame. Don’t know. That’s it, that was the answer. Come on, it is one of the most iconic things in this great city. And, by the way, it is one block from the hotel. Many people travel as tourists; know how to get your guests to the major points of interest.

This is not the fault of the employees; this is the fault of management. Whether you manage a division for a large corporation or are a solopreneur – get out from behind your desk and work your business, talk to your customers, answer the phones, and listen to your employees. You need to read:  Zombie Loyalists: Using Great Service to Create Rabid Fans, the latest book from Peter Shankman.

Know your business and know your business.

Topics: People Management, Customer Experience


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