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Call Center Occupancy Rate Formula Messages in this topic - RSS

Guest


2/1/2003
Guest
Can you explain the exact definition of occupancy rate? Thank you.

- John F. Mazzaro
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Guest


3/1/2003
Guest
Generally, occupancy is defined as the percentage of total sign-on time that an agent spends talking and doing legitimate after-call-work. Occupancy can be a good metric to use in judging whether agents are working too hard or too easy. In my view, occupancy is an outcome of the staffing, call demand, average handle time and service level goal. In general, as service level increases (goes up), occupancy will decrease (go down) for a given call demand. No matter what you do, you cannot have high service levels and high occupancy at the same time.

- Bill Durr
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Guest


3/1/2003
Guest
Occupancy is the percentage of time agents spend handling calls (and after call work) compared with the total amount of time they are plugged in and ready waiting for calls to arrive. For example, in a half hour period, an agent may spend 27 minutes doing work (total of call talk time and after call work time). If this were the case then occupancy would be 27 divided by 30 (as there are 30 minutes in the half hour), this would equate to an occupancy level of 90%. In fact, we would recommend that a comfortable and sustainable level of occupancy is around 85-88% - if agents are working at a higher level than this on a routine basis, you are likely to encounter problems such as staff sickness or turnover. For your information, occupancy is also known as agent utilization. Occupancy should not be mistaken for agent availability which is all about the percentage of time that an agent on shift is actually plugged in and available to take calls. Hope this helps.

- Becky Simpson, Managing Consultant, Improvement Solutions Ltd, UK, and Certified Associate, Incoming Calls Management Institute, Tel. +44 (0) 1926 640787, Fax: +44 (0) 1926 642281, becky@improvementsolutions.co.uk
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Guest


3/1/2003
Guest
Occupancy is a measure of how "busy" an agent is; it measures the time during the staffing interval that an agent was either in talk time or after call work mode... it's simply a percentage of the available time that the agent was actually working and not waiting for a call. 90% occupancy in any given half hour means the agent was working for a total of 27 minutes, waiting for a total of 3 minutes. Note that the "waiting" for call time (or availability, or sometimes called idle time) does not occur in a single burst except in very rare circumstances. It's divided up between the completion of a call and the arrival of another, so there may sometimes be never more than 10 or so seconds between work events. To calculate occupancy for any given agent, add up the actual handle time over the staffing increment and divide by the increment... be sure to convert from minutes to seconds if you need to. Keep in mind that if an agent has been in a workstate other than Talk, After Call Work or Available, this time should be deducted from the staffing increment. To calculate an overall occupancy rate, use your ACD statistical function, or add the total handle time for all agents, divide by the total available time in the increment (X agents times 1800 seconds). This should give you a good ballpark. Keep in mind that research has shown that steady, unrelenting occupancy rates that top around 94% lead to very fast agent burnout... they can sustain that level for a while, but not interval after interval. Also keep in mind that occupancy moves inversely with service level -- as service level increases, occupancy decreases, so you may have to tolerate a certain lower occupancy level in order to achieve a given service level. Remember, too, that you can't directly affect occupancy -- it's a function of how the calls come in and how you're staffed. In other words, you can't tell your agents that they need to up their occupancy, because they can't do anything about it one way or the other. Good luck, and I hope this helps.

- Jean A Bave-Kerwin, JBK Consulting, Certified Associate, Incoming Calls Management Institute, Tel. 518-478-9155, Fax: 518-478-9155, jbaveker@nycap.rr.com
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Guest


3/3/2006
Guest
In order to get an occupancy rate for the entire day, wouldn't the easiest calculation be 100% less the percentage of Wait time? For example if our total percentage of wait time for the day was 25.2%, would occupancy for the day be 75%?

Thanks for your help.

- Anonymous
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Guest


3/10/2006
Guest
Are you talking about customer wait time or staff idle time?

1) If you are referring to customer wait time, occupancy tends to be higher when customer wait (ASA) increases.

2) Staff idle time is the inverse relationship to occupied time (Calls handled x AHT). This is the correct method to calculate Occupancy.

Any ACD should be able to provide you the information.

Cheers

- Bernard Tsang, Medicare Australia
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Guest


3/9/2007
Guest
The comments posted are very useful.

My question is when calculating the Occupancy for one complete day should the formula be

Occupancy/Utilization = (Total time on calls + After call Work) / (Total Staff time - Total Breaks)
or
Occupancy/Utilization = (Total time on calls + After call Work) / Total Staff Time)

Which one is correct???

- Suniljith
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Guest


4/20/2007
Guest
Any of the calculations work. None of them are considered right or wrong.

Occupancy can be:
(Total ACD time + Total ACW time + Hold time) / (Total ACD time + Total ACW time + Hold time + Available time)

(Total ACD time + Total ACW time + Hold time) / Staff Time - Aux Time

(Total ACD time + Total ACW time + Hold time) / Staff Time - Break Time

(Total ACD time + Total ACW time + Hold time) / Staff Time

The list keeps going. The point is, just make sure you take the total daily workload and divide it by a number such as staff time or workload + available. There are many variations and none of them are more right, just different. You have to decide on how you want to measure it and why.

- Marek J Kwasniewski, JP Morgan Chase
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Guest


5/4/2007
Guest
Occupancy = (Staffed Time - Wait Time)/Staffed Time

- Josh Streets
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Guest


7/13/2007
Guest
Benchmark Portal provides a distinction between "occupancy" and "utilization" that can be summed up as follows:

- occupancy: subset (%) of total hours at work where agent is connected to ACD and engaged in call or ready to answer (i.e. refers to resource availability for calls)

- utilization: subset (%) of occupancy where agent is actually engaged in telephone mode (talk + hold + after call work) (i.e. refers to resource being used for calls)

Hope this helps,

- Mike
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Guest


2/11/2008
Guest
I actually use this formula to calculate occupancy:

(Skill set talk time + DN Talk Time + Not Ready time)/Logged in time

Skill set talk time: Agent incoming calls answer.
DN talk time: Outcoming calls.
Not ready time: Agent is not available to answer.

- C. S. C.
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