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Call Center Management Structure Messages in this topic - RSS

Guest


8/1/2004
Guest
I am currently creating a proposal to take our call center back in-house. I am having difficulty in determining what the leadership staffing needs will be for the center. There will be 50 FTEs made up of 30 full time & 40 part-time agents in the 24x7 call center. Currently, we are thinking that the following might work best: 1 Manager, Call Center Operations, over 1 Operations Supervisor over 2 Shift Supervisors over 3 Leads each over 12 to 15 Agents each I am very interested in how other call centers are structured. Please let me know if you can share any insight on this. Thanks.

- Luanne M. Lo Monte, Diggers Hotline, Inc.
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Guest


9/1/2004
Guest
Luanne, you must be very busy putting your proposal together. I hope my observations help: I must say that the structure that you have in mind seems to have more levels in than I would normally expect to see here in the UK and Europe - operations here tend to be much flatter in structure. As a general rule, what I am seeing currently is: 10 - 15 agents per team leader (lower numbers being seen in those operations that deliver more complex products or services and where more coaching time is needed). Where there are part-time agents employed some operations have part-time team leaders to match the hours their staff work (but with smaller teams, say 6 -10 agents) or in many cases a full time team leader will have a larger number of part time agents reporting into them, say 15 - 18 part time agents to one full time team leader. 6 - 8 team leaders per team manager 6 - 8 team managers to one call centre / operations manager In your case, as yours would be a relatively small operation, the ratios may not work out quite like this because you will need to have some kind of 'duty manager' cover 24/7. Provided your team leaders were very capable, highly skilled call centre professionals, there is no reason why they could not act as Duty Manager. With this in mind, on the face of it I would suggest one Operations Manager, one Team Manager and 4 - 5 Team Leaders - potentially this gives 6 -7 potential Duty Managers to cover all hours. It really is a hard question to answer without knowing more about what you do, your culture, etc., but maybe this will give you some 'food for thought.' Best wishes,

- Becky Simpson, Managing Consultant, Improvement Solutions Ltd, UK, and Certified Associate, Incoming Calls Management Institute, Tel. +44 (0) 1926 640787, Fax: +44 (0) 1926 642281, becky@improvementsolutions.co.uk
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Guest


6/28/2006
Guest
We have one team manager for 15 agents, with a Bank Captain and a mentor/Q.A per team. It's simple and it works, so I suggest you have:
1 project Manager over-looking it all; 3 Teams each with one Team manager, One Bank Captain and one mentor/Q.A., and with the part-time people, have a Bank Captain per 10.

- Rich, TLC
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Guest


1/28/2008
Guest
Luanne,

I am currently a frontline supervisor in a call center and have about 24 customer service representatives reporting to me. We have 6 teams with similar numbers of reps on our first shift and one senior supervisor with a manager that oversees the whole call center. This works well and I think the number is manageable.

I would love to know more about how other call centers are structured as I am writing a master's thesis on the topic of call center leadership.

- Karen, L.L. Bean, Inc.
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Guest


7/28/2008
Guest
We have a newly created structure that I believe will permit us to support the strategic and operational goals of our team. We are a neighborhood clinic group (seven clinics) with a centralized call center for appointments and patient access.

1. Director (position also includes responsibility of strategy and process improvement to improve access to our clinics)
1. Operations Manager (assigned to call center team)
2. Supervisors, each a direct report team of approximately 15 phone Reps and 1 Senior Technician
2. Senior Technicians - (1) Lead & (1) Trainer

- Christa, UW Medicine
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Guest


8/11/2008
Guest
While our centre is not 24/7, we do have a management structure that is similar to what you are looking at.

We have one Regional Operations Manager (four centres, four Regional Operations Managers) who directs four Supervisors. Each Supervisor oversees three Specialists (think Team Leader), and each Specialist oversees seven to eight reps on each team. The teams also each have one tenured agent that provides coverage for the Specialist/Team Leader when not available (ahh ... so many meetings). We believe that having less staff report to each Specialist and Supervisor allows us to really understand and support our staff. We get to the heart of successes and opportunities in a very timely manner, and this assists us in retention and individual development.

- Renee MacQuarrie
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Guest


8/11/2008
Guest
I tend to agree on a flatter structure for that small an operation. I currently have about the same size call center, and we have:

1:15 FTE (37.5 hrs/week) per Team Leader
4 Team Leaders
1 Operations/Call Center Manager
1 General Manager

A flatter structure will allow for better implementation as well as having your management team close to the business and aware of the day-to-day challenges. Especially when building the call center, there will need to be hands-on management. Too many levels dilutes the need to be hands-on as there ends up being too many managers for the phone staff.

- Spiros Malevitis, General Manager, Computershare Investor Services
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Guest


8/11/2008
Guest
Luanne,

Your question addresses the scope of responsibility for your management team. I recommend that you approach the organizational design from the customer's perspective. "What will it take for you to provide warm, friendly, and competent service when I call?"

Rather than approaching this from the 'numbers perspective' as a goal, I recommend that the "numbers," i.e., supervisor scope ratio, should be a "result" of your targeted level of support.

I have designed multiple management structures for varied complexities of customer support -- from PC technical support with an AHT of 12-15 minutes to basic customer service with 30 second handle times. I recommend that you consider the following before you make your final decision. I'll only address the front line supervisor here.

Complexity of the call drivers
Typically, I determine complexity based on the length of classroom training required for a new agent. An agent who can exit the classroom training in less than two weeks would be on the low end of the complexity scale and eight weeks or longer on the high end. The greater the complexity of the calls, the more agents need supervisory support. This assumes however that your supervisors are knowledgeable of the technology that is being supported. For general PC support of one of the largest PC manufacturers I recommended a scope of 15-1 as a guide. However, if you are in a ramp-up mode and there will be a large number of newly hired agents, I recommend a transition team with lower scope, say 8-12 to one.

Management Skills and Experience
Another consideration is the skills and experience of your front line people. An experienced and highly skilled supervisor can handle a considerably larger scope of responsibility than an inexperienced one.

Budget
One final consideration may trump all of these suggestions, and that is the gross margin for the product, service, or technology you are supporting. If you have the luxury of large margins and can justify a "high touch" level of support, I will always recommend a lower scope of responsibility for your front line supervisor.

So once you have established what it will take to provide the support your customers need, then you will know how many front line and supporting managers you will require. I think you will be much more successful approaching your organizational design questions from this perspective.

- John Bray, Quality3, LLC
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Guest


8/11/2008
Guest
It all depends on the nature of campaigns. On average there should be a 1:7 ratio (for every seven agents there should be one lead person), but again, as I mentioned, that depending on the campaigns. Based on the above mentioned ratio you could then re-arrange your structure as required.

Our company does both the onshore and offshore campaigns. As per the requirements by the clients some of our campaigns are with 1:7 ratio and others are 1:15. Different campaigns, different needs, alternate solutions. --

- Khurram Shah Khan, Esquare Services
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rayeed
rayeed
Posts: 3


12/19/2015
rayeed
rayeed
Posts: 3
Hi! I have recently started working with a contact center which has 340 inbound/Outbound CSRs. We don't seem to have any ratios in place. So could somebody tell me 1. How many supervisors should there be for per team of 10 and how many more CSRs can i stretch that to? 2. How many Team Leaders should there be for 4 supervisors (if i have the hierarchy switched, please do tell me that as well because I am trying to learn :)) ? 3. How many QA/QC should there be for each team? 4. How many voice logs should a QA/QC listen to everyday for assure the quality of customer service? 5. How should the QA/QC or supervisor or team leader treat a fresh CSR (customer service rep) vs. a senior CSR as far as quality of customer service is concerned? I am revamping this contact center and therefore will be preparing a presentation on this so your help will be incredibly appreciated.
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talkagent
talkagent
Posts: 3


29 days ago
talkagent
talkagent
Posts: 3
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